Symbolism Versus Substance

Chris Weigant: Political Writer and Blogger at ChrisWeigant.com Posted: January 19, 2011 08:21 PM


 

The House of Representatives, as expected, just voted to repeal the landmark healthcare law, which President Obama signed less than a year ago. This vote was a symbolic victory for Republicans, but not any sort of substantial change. To truly repeal the law, the Senate would have to also pass the bill the House just passed, and then both houses would have to muster a two-thirds majority vote to overcome Obama’s veto. None of which is going to happen. Democrats still control the Senate, and Harry Reid has all but pronounced the bill “dead on arrival” in his chamber, meaning that today’s House vote is the only victory (and a symbolic one, at that) Republicans should expect in their mad dash to repeal healthcare reform.

Which is probably fine with them. House Republicans know full well that their vote today is nothing more than empty symbolism — but it is important empty symbolism, as far as they’re concerned. The Tea Party Republicans who campaigned on the issue of “Repeal!” have proven their bona fides to their fervent supporters, and now they can throw up their hands and blame the expected inaction on Senate Democrats — thus paying no real political price for spending time on such a Pyrrhic victory. In other words, Republicans in the House have won a single “news cycle” — even though the more honest among them fully admit that the effort is ultimately going nowhere.

The entire exercise is nothing more than “politics for politics’ sake,” really. Which is fine — both political parties do this sort of thing at times, to toss some symbolic red meat to their base. And as political red meat goes, this was the juiciest symbolism Republicans had at their disposal. The last time Republicans engaged in such potent symbolism was when Newt Gingrich took control of the House, and quickly passed all the items on his “Contract With America” — only to see virtually all of the bills screech to a halt in the Senate.

Republicans can bask in this symbolic victory, but when Congress really gets down to business (after next week’s State of the Union speech by President Obama), things are going to get a bit more complicated. The campaign slogan many of these Republicans ran on (in relation to what they called “Obamacare”) was “Repeal and replace.” In other words, throw the whole thing out and then start over and replace it with the wonderfulness of the Republican plan on healthcare reform. The only problem with this scenario (other than the fact that repeal isn’t going anywhere after the bill leaves the House) is that there is no “Republican plan on healthcare.” It doesn’t exist.